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Poverty, child labor and endless struggle

The Nanded district in the Marathwada region of Maharashtra is one of the most parched areas of the state. With agriculture being the main means of livelihood, and many people being daily wage laborers, unavailability of water has forced most workers to migrate to big cities. They work in brick kilns and move with their families to break sugarcane. Some work in factories in Mumbai and Pune. Women find employment as domestic help, and some men work together as aids and salespeople in clothing stores. The people working in these shops are mostly Dalits who live in nearby areas, usually in ghettos.

Lost Childhood in the Char Chaporis of Assam

Seven-year-old Amreen from the Char area in Barpeta, Assam, misses her best friend Amu who has migrated to Chandan Basti in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh with her family. Amu doesn’t go to school and stays at home taking care of her household while everyone else in her family engages in door-to-door waste collection. Although she doesn’t engage in child labor outside her house, the burden of taking care of the household falls on her at such a tender age. Due to the language barrier, there is little space for her in the local schools of Lucknow where the medium of instruction is English and Hindi.

Child helpline ‘integrated’ with Mission Vatsalya, concerns of data misuse

With the government publishing draft guidelines for CHILDLINE under the Mission Vatsalya Yojana for Child Protection Services, the ongoing tussle, between the government and the current civil society stakeholders of CHILDLINE, to merge the helpline number with the emergency helpline number, has not reached any resolution yet. After the merger, the helpline will be “integrated” with the Home Ministry’s universal emergency helpline number 112.

Should There Be A Separate Government Helpline For Children?

“Only a fraction of complaints require police intervention. This can still continue to happen; NGO can always take support of counsellors or police whenever they require. For this the helpline does not have to be merged,” said Kavita, Director Advocacy of the Concerned for Working Children.

Lost Childhood In The Char Chaporis Of Assam

Seven-year-old Amreen from the Char area in Barpeta, Assam, misses her best friend Amu who has migrated to Chandan Basti in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh with her family. Amu doesn’t go to school and stays at home taking care of her household while everyone else in her family engages in door-to-door waste collection. Although she doesn’t engage in child labor outside her house, the burden of taking care of the household falls on her at such a tender age. Due to the language barrier, there is little space for her in the local schools of Lucknow where the medium of instruction is English and Hindi.

Poverty, Child Labour And Endless Struggle

The Nanded district in the Marathwada region of Maharashtra is one of the most parched areas of the state. With agriculture being the main means of livelihood, and many people being daily wage labourers, the unavailability of water has forced most workers to migrate to big cities. They work in brick kilns and move with their families to break sugarcane. Some work in factories in Mumbai and Pune. Women find employment as domestic help, and some men work together as aids and salespeople in clothing stores. The people working in these shops are mostly Dalits who live in nearby areas.

Poverty making kids drop out of schools

The Nanded district in the Marathwada region of Maharashtra is one of the most parched areas of the state. With agriculture being the main means of livelihood, and many people being daily wage labourers, unavailability of water has forced most workers to migrate to big cities. They work in brick kilns and move with their families to break sugarcane. Some work in factories in Mumbai and Pune. Women find employment as domestic help, and some men work together as aids and salespeople in clothing stores. The people working in these shops are mostly Dalits who live in nearby areas.

Child helpline merger may hurt the response

With the government publishing draft guidelines for CHILDLINE under the Mission Vatsalya Yojana for child protection services, the ongoing tussle between the government and the civil society stakeholders of CHILDLINE has not reached any resolution yet. After the merger, the helpline will be “integrated” with the Home Ministry’s universal emergency helpline number 112. Moksha, who works as a child helpline staffer in Vadodara, Gujarat, says: “A lot of times kids do not want to tell their problems to even their parents as they may be scared of their reaction.”

Lost Childhood in the Char Chaporis of Assam

Seven-year-old Amreen from the Char area in Barpeta, Assam, misses her best friend Amu who has migrated to Chandan Basti in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh with her family. Amu doesn’t go to school and stays at home taking care of her household while everyone else in her family engages in door-to-door waste collection. Although she doesn’t engage in child labor outside her house, the burden of taking care of the household falls on her at such a tender age. Due to the language barrier, there is little space for her in the local schools of Lucknow where the medium of instruction is English and Hindi.

Covid- 19 forched street kids to sell drugs

Several street children, who themselves or through their families depended on the Railways’ ecosystem for their livelihood, were forced to sell drugs, steal iron rods and beg in order to survive during the pandemic, according to stories covered in Balaknama, which is a newsletter brought out by street children. Balaknama sheds light on a wide ranging issue that affects children living in streets spread across Delhi, Noida, Lucknow and Agra. Overall, all such children saw families losing their jobs, running out of funds to buy food and pay rent, facing lack of drinking water, clocking long waiting time

Child labour: Pandemic forces children to sell drugs, steal iron rod

Several street-children who themselves or through their families depended on the Railways’ ecosystem for their livelihood were forced to sell drugs, steal iron rods and beg in order to survive during the pandemic, according to stories covered in Balaknama, which is a newsletter brought out by street connected children. Balaknama sheds light on wide ranging issues that affect children living in streets spread across Delhi, Noida, Lucknow and Agra.

No Country For Railway Platform Children In A Pandemic

As Covid-19 raged and forced a shutdown on Indian Railways in March 2020, tens of thousands of children dependent on railway platform – directly or indirectly — for their livelihood suddenly had nowhere to go. Many such children spilled over to temples and gurudwaras in search of food, begging for alms, others tried their luck at streetlights, though often chided by police from time to time. Some others took shelter in Rain Baseras

Poverty and the draw of the railway platform

an 18-year-old adolescent looks purposeful but a little restless as he moves from one trash can to the next picking up empty plastic water bottles at New Delhi Railway Station. It is a sunny morning and his plans for the day are set. He will now proceed to the raddi wali gali (the trash buyers’ lane) where he hopes to sell the plastic bottles to the recyclers. When he was younger, he begged for a living. He also worked as a chana (a chickpea-based snack) vendor, and in desperate times, stole a few mobile phones as well. Tarun, another 18-year-old, who collects empty bottles from another platform—one among the 16 platforms at the railway station

No country for railways’-platform children in a pandemic

As Covid-19 raged and forced a shutdown on Indian Railways in March 2020, tens of thousands of children dependent on a railway platform – directly or indirectly — for their livelihood suddenly had nowhere to go. Many such children spilled over to temples and gurudwaras in search of food, begging for alms, others tried their luck at streetlights, though often chided by police from time to time. Some others took shelter in Rain Baseras (night shelters), and few left with no choice returned to homes

Bridging the learning gap through Mission Buniyad

Pooja, a student in a government school in Saket, Delhi had been waiting to return to school for the past two years. As the classes commenced online during the pandemic, she missed almost all the classes because she did not have a mobile phone. “I used to go to my friend’s house so that I could attend the online class.

Poverty and the draw of the railway platform

Puneet, an 18-year-old adolescent looks purposeful but a little restless as he moves from one trash can to the next picking up empty plastic water bottles at New Delhi Railway Station. It is a sunny morning and his plans for the day are set. He will now proceed to the raddi wali gali (the trash buyers’ lane) where he hopes to sell the plastic bottles to the recyclers. When he was younger, he begged for a living. He also worked as a chana (a chickpea-based snack) vendor, and in desperate times, stole a few mobile phones as well.

Railway To Now Use Tech To Stop Child Trafficking, But What About Privacy Rights?

In the backdrop of international development agencies such as International Labour Organisation (ILO) warning an imminent rise in the incidence of child-trafficking during the pandemic, the Railway Police Force aims to use technology to outsmart unscrupulous elements trafficking children. It is rolling out a new set of SOPs (standard operating procedures) issued in December 2021 which spells out much more clearly the roles and responsibilities of different official arms—ranging from station officials to railway police officials.

Poverty and the draw of the railway platform

An 18-year-old adolescent looks purposeful but a little restless as he moves from one trash can to the next picking up empty plastic water bottles at New Delhi Railway Station. It is a sunny morning and his plans for the day are set. He will now proceed to the raddi wali gali (the trash buyers’ lane) where he hopes to sell the plastic bottles to the recyclers. When he was younger, he begged for a living. He also worked as a chana 

Railways plans to use tech to tighten vigil on child trafficking

In the backdrop of international development agencies such as International Labour Organisation (ILO) warning an imminent rise in incidence of child-trafficking during the pandemic, the Railway Police Force aims to use technology to outsmart unscrupulous elements trafficking children. It is rolling out a new set of SOPs (standard operating procedures) issued in December 2021 which spells out much more clearly

Bridging The Learning Gap Through Mission Buniyad

As children go back to school, a Delhi government programme to close the gap that has taken place in learning during the pandemic is helping in more ways than one. Pooja, a student in a government school in Saket, Delhi had been waiting to return to school for the past two years. As the classes commenced online during the pandemic, she missed almost all the classes because she did not have a mobile phone. “I used to go to my friend’s house so that I could attend the online class. But I mostly stayed and helped at home while my mother went out to work,” she said.

Closing the learning gaps left by Covid

Now that the children are going to schools, a Delhi Government programme to close the gap that has taken place in learning during the pandemic is helping in more ways than one. Pooja, a student in a government school in Saket, Delhi had been waiting to return to her school for the past two years. As the classes commenced online during the pandemic, she missed almost all the classes

Railways plans to use tech to tighten vigil on child trafficking

In the backdrop of international development agencies such as International Labour Organisation (ILO) warning an imminent rise in incidence of child-trafficking during the pandemic, the Railway Police Force aims to use technology to outsmart unscrupulous elements trafficking children. It is rolling out a new set of SOPs (standard operating procedures) issued in December 2021 which spells out much more clearly the roles and responsibilities

Perils of children on railway platform

The Covid-19 pandemic had left a telling impact on the street children, particularly those who lived off the railway platforms. The children are coming back to the railway platform after they had left following the shutdown of the train operations and excessive restrictions afterward for the entry and exit at the stations. The overall trend was echoed by Railway Children India (RCI), which works