Project Disha – APF English

Domestic Violence and Inaccessibility to OSCs in remote villages

Devti Devi (Name Changed), has a difficult life. At the age of 15, she was married to her parents, and ever since she has been fighting domestic violence. Her husband even tried to burn her alive, but she survived. Sharing another traumatizing experience, she said, “One day, he tried to smother me using a pillow.”

Fighting Colourism:”As She Is Dark-Skinned, They Will Ask For A Hefty Dowry!”

Children learn about colour based discrimination at a very young age. They start imitating discriminatory practices at home and at school. They start taking people’s emotion for granted and grow up into perpetrators of colour based discrimination. The obsession with fair skin is not new. Colourism in India has a deep-rooted history that has penetrated deeply into our mindset.

Need to address root-causes of domestic violence

Devti Devi (name changed) has a difficult life. At the age of 15, she got married, and her ordeal of domestic violence began at that time. Her husband even tried to burn her alive, but she survived. Discussing her trauma, she said, “One day, he tried to smother me using a pillow.” Devti is a resident of Ason village in Bageshwar district’s Kapkot block in Uttarakhand. Lately, cases of domestic violence in Uttarakhand have been on a rise.

Villages lack sports grounds for girls

Not much attention is given here [Kapkot, Uttarakhand] to girls’ participation in sports. There are many girls in the village, who can bring laurels to Uttarakhand in national and international tournaments if they are given the chances and facilities,” said Mamta and Pooja, a duo from Dhurkot Village in Bageshwar district in Uttarakhand. Lack of a proper playground with adequate facilities is a major problem in several places in Bageshwar.

In rural areas, dark-skinned girls still made to prove their worth

Although my daughter is smart and kind-hearted, I am worried about her marriage as she is dark-skinned.” This statement by a mother reflects the depth to which the aspect of skin colour affecting a person’s life exists in our patriarchal society. A girl’s life is entangled in the roots of patriarchy in such a way that our society’s obsession with fair skin is imposed on her throughout. Families, even today, mourn the birth of a girl child and, if she is dark

Online classes stall girls’ right to education, study shows

For the last two years, Mamta Goswami and her friends have packed their bags with notebooks and tiffin boxes not to go to school but to a place where they can find a network to attend their online classes. They leave in morning before classes began and return in the evening. However, there is no guarantee that the network will be stable for the entire day. While few girls are lucky enough to at least attend classes online

Lamchula village struggles to access clean drinking water

Lamchula is a picturesque hilly village nestled in the foothills of the Himalayas overlooking the beautiful Lahur Ghati river in the Bageshwar district in Uttarakhand. Located approximately 20 km from the district headquarters, there is no motorable road to the village and one has to trek for about thirty minutes to reach the settlements. Inhabited by approximately 143 families, this region is blessed with natural resources and water bodies.

Social stigma forces girls to stay in cow shed during menstruation

On a bright morning, Renu was about to start her day when she got her monthly period. All of her plans for the day, including the next five days, were shattered because she had to confide in the cowshed and live and eat there until her periods were over. Every month, she spends six days and seventy-two days a year in the cowshed. “Even if the cowshed is near or far, even if there is electricity in the cowshed or not, the cow in the cowshed is aggressive or meek, while menstruating, we have to spend every minute in there

Sickening Healthcare Facility in Village Karmi

 In India, majority of healthcare centres in rural and hilly areas have always been inadequate in providing quality health services. According to a report in 2018, only 11% Sub-Centres, 16% Community Health Centres (CHC) and 13% Primary Health Centres (PHC) meet the Indian Public Health Standards. Whereas the rest, lies just for the namesake lacking basic facilities and staff for treatments. 43 km away from the district headquarter Bageshwar

Four stories narrate the sexist realities of ambition in the mountains of Uttarakhand

“Thak chuki hun, Thoda Aaram Chahiye” (I am tired, I need rest) are the opening lines of the poem written by Chandni Parihar. She is just a twenty-one-year-old young girl who feels exhausted by the discrimination she has to face in her society. A resident of remote Jakhera village in Garur block of Bageshwar district in Uttarakhand, Chandni has been fighting to complete her education.

How Poor Network In Uttarkhand’s Bageshwar Has Impacted Girls’ Education

For the last two years, Mamta Goswami and her friends have packed their bags with notebooks and tiffin boxes not to go to school but to a place where they can find a network to attend their online classes. They leave in the morning before classes begin and return in the evening. However, there is no guarantee that the network will be stable for the entire day. While few girls are lucky enough to at least attend classes online, many are not allowed by their parents

Imagine A School Without Toilets: It’s The Reality In Bageshwar

Khusbu Bora, Uttarakhand: Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) play an essential role in girls’ education. Lack of water and sanitation facilities often prevents girls from attending school, leading to an uncertain future. The Maigri Estate Inter College in Garur block in the Bageshwar district of Uttarakhand is a well-built government institution with good classroom infrastructure and a sports ground. Yet, it lacks the most basic structure-toilets. About 21 kms away from Bageshwar, this inter-college offers education from class VI to XII and has a student population of around 400, half of which comprises girls.

In 2022, Lamchula Village Is Still Struggling For Clean Drinking Water

Lamchula is a picturesque hilly village nestled in the foothills of the Himalayas overlooking the beautiful Lahur Ghati river in Bageshwar district in Uttarakhand. Located approximately 20 km from the district headquarters, there is no motorable road to the village and one has to trek for about thirty minutes to reach the settlements. Inhabited by approximately 143 families, this region is blessed with natural resources and water bodies. The residents of this remote village, however, continue to struggle to access

Gender Stereotypes In Villages That Promote Prejudice

Gender discrimination manifests in stereotypes that are intertwined in society in such a way that not acting accordingly may lead to an individual’s isolation within the community. This risk and fear of ostracisation, however, exists more in disadvantaged rural communities. In addition, cut off from the fast-paced and constantly evolving world of urban areas, villages are almost always stuck in a time warp. These stereotypes are perceived differently in more archaic forms in rural areas.

Patriarchy Still Rules In Uttarakhand’s Karmi, Schemes For Women Don’t Work There

The Central and state authorities have come up with several schemes for women and girls but there is a huge gap between formulation of the schemes and benefits reaching those targeted. Most importantly, Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials should be distributed by local authorities to address social evils such as seclusion of women and girls during menstruation, child marriage, unfair treatment and discrimination towards girls and women, all of which affect their access to social schemes

The Pathetic State Of Health Care Services In Uttarkhand’s Karmi Village

In India, the majority of healthcare centres in rural and hilly areas have largely been inadequate in providing quality health services. According to a report in 2018, only 11 per cent sub-centres, 16 per cent community health centres and 13 per cent primary health centres meet the Indian Public Health Standards, while the rest lack basic facilities and staff for treatments. Here is the story of the sad state of affairs in a village in Uttarakhand.

Menstruating Women Are Forced To Stay In The Cowshed In An Uttarkhand Village

Renu was about to start her day on a bright morning when she got her monthly periods. All her plans for the day, including the next five days, were shattered because she had to confine herself in the cowshed and live and eat there until her periods were over. She spends six days every month and seventy-two days a year in the cowshed.

Girls Have All The Duties; Boys All The Rights

“We are stopped from expressing ourselves. We have to muster up courage to put our opinions forth but no one cares. No one values our voices—neither our families nor the society,” said Pooja, a teenager from Kapkot village in Kapkot block of Bageshwar district in Uttarakhand. “They say girls are not supposed to laugh or talk too much.” Eighteen-year-old Kumari Kiran, another young girl from Jakhera village in Garur block of Bageshwar

Children In Uttarkhand’s Jhopara Have To Walk For 3 Hours To Get To School

Uttarakhand welcomes thousands of tourists every year. Travelers from across the states make efforts to reach this hilly region nestled in the mighty Himalayan range. The natural beauty of this state often masks the challenges its inhabitants face in their daily life

The Pathetic State Of Health Care Services In Uttarkhand’s Karmi Village

In India, the majority of healthcare centres in rural and hilly areas have largely been inadequate in providing quality health services. According to a report in 2018, only 11 per cent sub-centres, 16 per cent community health centres and 13 per cent primary health centres meet the Indian Public Health Standards, while the rest lack basic facilities and staff for treatments. Here is the story of the sad state of affairs in a village in Uttarakhand.

Disconnected Lives in far-flung mountain regions

Uttarakhand welcomes thousands of tourists every year. Travelers from across the states make efforts to reach this hilly region nestled in the mighty Himalayan range. The natural beauty of this state often masks the challenges its inhabitants face in their daily life – what appears to be quintessential rural life to these travelers, is in reality suffering for people residing in far-flung mountain regions.

Gender stereotypes in villages promote prejudice

Gender discrimination manifests in stereotypes that is intertwined in the society in such a way that not acting accordingly may lead to an individual’s isolation within the community. This risk and fear of ostracisation, however, exists more in the disadvantaged rural communities.

Patriarchy still rules- here schemes for women don’t work

More than two-thirds of Indians live in villages, but the healthcare facilities in these areas are yet to show the progress seen in urban areas. The chances of you going to a rural health facility without a doctor or a health professional are still very high in the country. The analysis of the data available with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare tells us that things are way worse than they used to be 17 years ago

Menstruation in the Cowshed

Renu was about to start her day on a bright morning when she got her monthly periods. All her plans for the day, including the next five days, were shattered because she had to confine herself in the cowshed and live and eat there until her periods were over. She spends six days every month and seventy-two days a year in the cowshed.

Girls in uttarakhand aspire to live freely

Thak chuld hun, Thoda Aaram Chahiye,” (I am tired, I need rest) are the opening lines of the poem written by Chandni Parihar. She is just a 21-year-old girl who feels exhaust-ed by the discrimination she has to face in her society. A resident of remote Jakhera village in Garur block of Bageshwar district in Uttarakhand, Chandni has been fighting to complete her education. Chandni was the first girl from her vil-lage to score 65 per cent in Class 10. She wanted to pursue science, but due to the unavailability of this stream in the village schools, she could not fulfill her dreams.

 The pathetic state of health care services in a village

When Leela Devi first went to her marital home in Tilonia Village in Ajmer district of Rajasthan, she had not heard of solar energy. But making use of the solar centre of the Barefoot College (BC) near her new home, she learnt enough within a year to set up rural solar units and assemble solar lanterns. Later, as India’s External Affairs Ministry teamed up with BC to start an international programme for training women as barefoot solar engineers for rural solar

Disconnected Lives

Uttarakhand welcomes thousands of tourists every year. Travelers from across the states make efforts to reach this hilly region nestled in the mighty Himalayan range. The natural beauty of this state often masks the challenges its inhabitants face in their daily life – what appears to be quintessential rural life to these travelers, is in reality a suffering for people residing in far-flung mountain regions. Uttarakhand’s Bageshwar district is one such example where communities

Girls have all the duties; boys all the rights

We are stopped from expressing ourselves. We have to muster up courage to put our opinions forth but no one cares. No one values our voices—neither our families nor the society,” said Pooja, a teenager from Kapkot village in Kapkot block of Bageshwar district in Uttarakhand. “They say girls are not supposed to laugh or talk too much.” Eighteen-year-old Kumari Kiran, another young girl from Jakhera

Struggling for water in the Himalayan foothills

Lamchula is a picturesque hilly village nestled in the foothills of the Himalayas overlooking the beautiful Lahur Ghati river in Bageshwar district in Uttarakhand. Located approximately 20 km from the district headquarters, there is no motorable road to the village and one has to trek for about thirty minutes to reach the settlements. Inhabited by approximately 143 families

A School Without Toilets

Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) play an important role in girls’ education. Lack of water and sanitation facilities often prevents girls from attending schools, leading to an uncertain future. The Maigri Estate Inter College in Garur block in Bageshwar district of Uttarakhand is a well-built government institution with good classroom infrastructure and a sports ground. Yet, it lacks the most basic structure-toilets.

A school without toilets

Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) play an important role in girls’ education. Lack of water and sanitation facilities often prevents girls from attending schools, leading to an uncertain future. The Maigri Estate Inter College in Garur Block in Bageshwar District of Uttarakhand is a government institution with good classroom infrastructure and a sports ground. Yet, it lacks the most basic structure-toilets. About 21 kms away from Bageshwar, this inter-college offers education from class VI to XII and has a student population of around 400, half of them girls

Network Woes

For the last two years, Mamta Goswami and her friends have packed their bags with notebooks and tiffin boxes not to go to school but to a place where they can find a network to attend their online classes. They leave in the morning before classes begin and return in the evening. However, there is no guarantee that the network will be stable for the entire day. While few girls are lucky enough to at least attend classes online, many are not allowed